WASLA | Call for Design Leads – Empowering BIPOC Youth: Pathways to Sustainable Design Futures

For the next cohort UWASLA Youth Outreach; Empowering BIPOC Youth: Pathways to Sustainable Design Futures, will be working with DRCC Youth Corps on a series of events to redesign Jack Block Park. We are looking for people interested in joining the events to lead the youth in the process of design. Please refer to the flyer for more information regarding the project. A LOOK INSIDE THE PROJECT: In the month of May, Empowering BIPOC Youth: Pathways to Sustainable Design Futures, will be
working with DRCC Youth Corps on a design mock studio to redesign Jack Block Park. During each event we will have a presentation stating the goals of the day. Then in smaller teams the youth will collaborate on designing their ideal Jack Block Park. Leads will be present and work with the youth to answer questions and push their designs. We hope to empower students in the design field by letting them make their own choices, we are there to support and elevate their designs. Please note there is an opportunity to join the planning team that works on organizing the outline of each event. If you’re interested please fill out this short survey to have you listed!Email with any questions: arevam@uw.edu
Learn More!​​​​​​​

Inaugural Landscape Architecture Furniture Studio

During Autumn 2021, the Furniture Studio, a legacy course in the Architecture department, was offered to Landscape Architecture students for the first time. While the focus on craft and material remained constant, the context of the work provided a unique scale and scope not previously used in furniture studios.

Architecture faculty members Kimo Griggs and Steven M. Withycombe worked with 12 MLA and BLA students to design and fabricate landscape furniture.

Students receive a primer on lumber dimensions and wood types in the Fab Lab (photo by Sihong Zhu)

From infrastructure to buildings to landscapes, the built environment is furnished at a variety of scales. Furniture has been a critical organizing feature for centuries, signifying power, providing perspective, defining and supporting social organizations, comfort and health. Learning how to design and make furniture in the landscape is an education in landscape architecture writ small, including design strategy, ethics, team-work and sustainability. Investing in lasting materials and methods to produce full-scale, carefully-considered designs provides an extraordinary and lasting student experience. The inaugural Landscape Furniture Studio of Autumn 2021 produced a wide array of excellent designs, setting a high bar for future students.Professor Kimo Griggs
For her “Acoustic Chair”, Laura Swett bends steel angle along a constantly-changing curve using the Hossfeld Bender. (Photo by Kimo Griggs)

Students especially appreciated the course for advancing dialogue in interdisciplinary exploration at an object-level and the opportunity to work intimately with fabrication processes prioritizing the details of craft and making.

Furniture exists in every built environment, and as a result, it sits on the nexus of so many different fields. Kimo often said that you could “resolve the world in a piece of furniture” and I think that applies just as well to landscape design, architecture, city planning, and every other built environments field. It was so valuable to be able to work with architecture professors, as well, because it’s very easy to get ensconced in your department’s way of thinking. I feel that I have learned so much more having been exposed to different pedagogies in this very departmentally collaborative studio.Isa Lewis, BLA ‘23
Student standing next to their 3D printed chair3D printed white chair sitting on concrete steps
Furniture studio fit perfectly into the MLA sequence. It complimented the work I was doing in Materials Craft and Construction and helped me understand both assemblies and materials more deeply. It’s so rare to have a full design-build experience in school, especially on a design that is all your own, and it was incredibly gratifying to experience the entire design process in a microcosm of a single piece of landscape furniture.Jesse Sleamaker, MLA ‘23

This longed-anticipated course will be part of the annual studio rotation moving forward. We’re looking forward to the interdisciplinary innovations that will come out of this studio for years to come.

(Click on the photos below for more information on each piece.)

Student working on a piece of concreteStudents with their pieces after a successful concrete pourPerson sitting on a wood benchDouble-sided wood benchPerson giving a thumbs up standing next to their project in the fabrication labPerson sitting on a bench taking a selfiePerson sitting a low to the ground wood chairStudent working on wood chair

 

Final review jury including Daniel Winterbottom, Steve Withycombe, Kimo Griggs, and Penny Maulden. (Photo by Vanessa Lee)