Tiaki Over Time: New Zealand Study Abroad 2020

New.Zealand_tiaki

 

Course Instructor

Nancy Rottle + Paul Olson

Course Date

Winter 2020

Course Type

Study Abroad Program
New Zealand

In Winter 2020, fourteen graduate landscape architecture students toured urban design and landscape architecture projects in three distinctly different New Zealand cities—Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington—prior to undertaking a project in post-earthquake Christchurch. Anticipating river corridor inundation from earthquake induced subsidence and projected sea level rise, students proposed new stop bank (levee) configurations to provide both flood protection and ecological restoration, designing to embrace change, in concert with development of multi-faceted public river access points or “landings.” Led by Professor Nancy Rottle and Lecturer Paul Olson, the studio featured the Maori concept of tiaki, or care for people and land, and engaged generous local practitioners and citizens in their process. The student design work was complemented by travel media studies and explorations, and individual independent studies and creative projects. The group finished the trip together by studying and staying at an exemplary eco-resort near Queenstown, established by the visionaries of Puget Sound’s own Islandwood, Paul and Debbi Brainerd. A booklet, Ōtākaro Avon Landings, Tiaki Over Time: Ecocultural Regeneration and Climate Change Resilience for the Ōtākaro Avon Green Spine, documents the group’s design explorations and can be accessed at a new website, www.uwtiakiovertime.wordpress.com. The website also features studio work from the Winter 2019 Christchurch New Zealand program, and a gallery of this year’s independent study projects. We invite you to have a look!

UW Tiaki Overtime Website

2018 Building New Global Connections | Croatia Design/Build

This story originally appeared on College of Built Environments website on October 23, 2019. You can see the original story here.


The UW Landscape Architecture Croatia Design/Build program gives students the unique opportunity to make a lasting, physical impact in their host community. Professor Daniel Winterbottom, an expert in the creation of healing and therapeutic gardens, leads the program.

American and Croatian teammates together after final construction of the reflexology path.

With Professor Winterbottom as their guide, students explore the role of restorative landscapes in the built environment through hands-on learning. They study the history of healthcare in Croatia while also exploring the unique culture, food, and architecture heritage of the region. Finally, the students gain practical experience, working together to solve a real-world design/build problem. Last year, students were tasked with creating a new outdoor physical therapy rehabilitation space at the “Prim. Dr. Martin Horvat” Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Hospital.

Located just outside the city of Rovinj, on the western coast of the Istrian peninsula, the hospital is among the oldest orthopedic-rehabilitation institutes. It specializes in offering modern hydrotherapy treatments to patients coming from throughout Europe. The close proximity to the temperate waters of the Adriatic Sea allows the hospital to offer both indoor and outdoor hydrotherapy facilities during much of the year. For the students, this means having the opportunity to design a functional, therapeutic outdoor space to serve both patients and staff. The build portion of the program further allows students to become adept with key landscape construction techniques, materials, and project management approaches – skills that often aren’t practically addressed in a traditional classroom setting.

Professor Winterbottom leads a workshop on techniques for hand representation.

For Elizabeth Lange, a Master of Landscape Architecture Student, the most memorable part of the experience was the opportunity to build strong connections and foster teamwork with her fellow American and Croatian classmates.

“Every day it was a lot of work and long days, but it was fun to be with the people in the program and learn new things,” she shared. “I became very close with my classmates because of this program.”

Elizabeth also felt that the unique opportunity to participate in a design/build program was particularly useful for rounding out her educational experience, especially as she prepares to enter professional practice in the near future.

“A design build program forces you to think about your design and the practicality of it,” she explained. “In design school, we don’t normally construct what we design, so the sky is the limit in some sense, but in a design/build that isn’t the case. You can think of grand ideas but then you also have to factor in the budget and feasibility of it in order for it to work in the real world. I think that is an important thing to experience in school going forward.”

Perhaps one of the most important aspects of the study abroad experience is the way in which it allows students to frame their own life and experiences in the context of a broader perspective.

For Elizabeth, her time in Croatia gave her valuable personal insights and allowed her to build stronger relationships with others – both key hallmarks of a successful study abroad experience.

“I learned a lot about myself and my abilities during this program through my relationship with my friends and through the relationship of design,” Elizabeth shared.

 


Photo credits: Rhiannon Neuville and the 2018 Croatia Design Build class.

2018 Design+Build in Dals Langed, Sweden

In collaboration with students from HDK-Steneby, a design and crafts school located in Dals Långed, 15 students from University of Washington’s College of Built Environments, led by Professor Daniel Winterbottom, worked with the local immigrant and refugee community to create a community garden intended to improve well-being, alleviate the stresses of the integration process and connect this group with the broader community. The project goal was to create a deeper level of trust, connection and mutual respect between longtime residents and new arrivals.

The result of this project—a new public space—should greatly increase the quality of life for local residents, as it fills a need which was not previously supported by any of the existing spaces in Dals Långed: an outside meeting place where people of different ages, cultures and interests can meet and come together.


Course Details

Interdisciplinary Undergraduate + Graduate Studio
Study Abroad in Dals Langed, Sweden
Summer 2018
Instructor: Daniel Winterbottom

Students draw from Canadian context

For one week in mid-June, students explored the similarities and differences between US and Canadian urban environments as they visited three Canadian cities: Montreal, Quebec City, and Ottawa.

The field study was led by Fritz Wagner, Professor Emeritus in the departments of Landscape Architecture and Urban Design & Planning and Dr. Regent Cabana, an Affiliate Professor (from New Orleans). They led a group of students from academic disciplines including urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, and real estate.

The experience helped students to gain a better understanding of economic, political, social, cultural, and urban issues within the Canadian context. They met with a number of professors from regional universities, government officials, and other urban experts who gave lectures and walking tours.  The course examined similarities and differences between US and Canadian cities while investigating current urban issues confronting communities in French-speaking Québec and Ottawa. Students studied the physical layout of cities, urban design, urban growth, central neighborhood revitalization projects, local governance, and historic preservation.  Students were required to keep a daily journal and write a comparative paper on a topic related to urban issues encountered in Canada.

 

Ōtākaro/Avon Cultural Trail

Course Instructors

Nancy Rottle

Course Date

Winter 2019

Course Type

Interdisciplinary Graduate Studio
Study Abroad in New Zealand

Course Description

In partnership with the University of Washington, a team of College of Built Environments graduate students (from Landscape Architecture, Architecture, and Urban Planning) embarked on a 10-week study abroad program in Christchurch, New Zealand. Following the 2010/2011 earthquakes and ongoing rebuild processes, students sought to study and most importantly learn from the city’s approach to post-earthquake recovery and resilience planning/design. The program, which ran from January to March 2019, provided a unique opportunity to leverage multidisciplinary thinking and place-based narratives to contribute to the community’s growing body of knowledge.

Based on Regenerate Christchurch’s plan to reinvigorate the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor and the organization’s desire to weave in a cultural trail, students endeavored to uncover the stories and themes that could be told along the river. We hope the ideas contained in this booklet—which range from conceptual designs to activities/programs—inspire imagination and provide the foundation for what’s next.

The cultural trail we have proposed has taken many forms—they range from trails of activities and programs to digital signage to collections of memories. The common thread that weaves them all together is a distinct effort to honor the past, present, and future of the river. The following proposals are not possible without a clean and healthy river, so let’s celebrate its value by stewarding it for future generations.

Explore the full Ōtākaro/Avon Studio Book.

What Seattle Can Learn from Denmark about Community-Owned Housing (The Urbanist)

MLA student Roxanne Glick went to Copenhagen, Denmark to study their community-owned housing model. She brought what she learned from her time living in Denmark and studying their housing system back to Seattle. Roxanne shared some of her discoveries with The Urbanist. Below is an excerpt from her article.

Inspired by the community ownership movement, I travelled to Denmark last fall to learn from a country known as one of the most cooperative in the world. A third of housing in Copenhagen is cooperatively-owned and the non-profit sector houses a fifth of Danes. I saw the benefits of community ownership but also how the struggle to create it has been forgotten and it has been almost entirely defeated by neoliberal policies in the last 18 years.

To my dismay, I found that Denmark is now considered a ‘post-welfare’ state, rapidly instating overlapping racist and neoliberal policies while housing prices have become unaffordable for many. During my time there in November, I witnessed the government passing neo-apartheid housing policiescalled the “ghetto package.” The package applies harsher, discriminatory laws and threatens demolition to poor and ethnically “non-Western” non-profit housing neighborhoods officially labeled “ghettos.” The “ghetto package” is not only racist, it leverages racist public opinion to undermine the non-profit housing associations sector’s self-determination.

But just as I am grateful that every Dane didn’t judge me for American political leadership, I found that many Danes still have open hearts and communitarian values. Through living in two communities and many interviews, I had the opportunity to learn about the vestiges of community-owned housing in Denmark before it’s lost from living memory.”

Read the full article in The Urbanist.

Roxanne’s travel was supported by the Valle Scholarship. Learn more about this opportunity.

2014 Croatia

2014 DESIGN/BUILD IN CROATIA

September 14th, 2013 – November 24th, 2013

Application Deadline:  April 13 2014
Application located here

Informational Sessions
Tuesday February 18th + Friday March 7th
12 pm in Gould Hall 142

Download the Program Brochure

Download the Program Poster

Program Description
Service: The Summer Croatia Design/Build 2014 Program is a service learning opportunity which brings students to the Psihijatrijska Bolnica Rab on the Island of Rab on the Mid-Adriatic Coast. Students will collaborate with our partners, the residents and therapists at the hospital to design and build some small modest therapeutic spaces within the hospital complex. This project will build upon work that was completed in Fall 2012 and 2013. The hospital contains extensive lavender fields, natural areas and a cluster of wards with courtyards and open spaces. Prior to being a hospital, the site was used for officers at the Rab Concentration Camp during WWII.

Education: Undergraduate, graduate and non-matriculated students in landscape architecture, architecture, anthropology, fine arts and other fields may apply. Students will design and build an “interactive landscape.” Students will learn the skills of small site design and construction detailing, management and community participation.

Adventure: Rab is strategically located by Zadar, Rijeka, the Velibit mountains, Island Krk and the Adriatic Coast and is accessible from Zagreb. These sites have re-known vernacular building, historic landscapes, and natural phenomena, which we will explore. Croatia has rich and varied features including Plitvice Lakes National Park, a World Heritage Site. This is the background through which we will explore the culture and history of Croatia.

For more information contact:
Prof. Daniel Winterbottom
Phone: 206.612.1146
Email: nina at uw dot edu
studyabroad.washington.edu

 

2013 Croatia

2013 STUDY ABROAD IN CROATIA

August 24th, 2013 – September 24th, 2013

Early Fall Exploration Seminar Program

Program Description
Service: The Summer Croatia Design/Build 2013 Program is a service learning opportunity which brings students to the Psihijatrijska Bolnica Rab on the Island of Rab on the Mid-Adriatic Coast. Students will collaborate with our partners, the residents and therapists at the hospital to design and build some small modest therapeutic spaces within the hospital complex. This project will build upon work that was completed in Fall 2012. The hospital contains extensive lavender fields, natural areas and a cluster of wards with courtyards and open spaces. Prior to being a hospital, the site was used for officers at the Rab Concentration Camp during WWII.

Education: Undergraduate, graduate and non-matriculated students in landscape architecture, architecture, anthropology, fine arts and other fields may apply. Students will design and build an “interactive landscape.” Students will learn the skills of small site design and construction detailing, management and community participation.

Adventure: Rab is strategically located by Zadar, Rijeka, the Velibit mountains, Island Krk and the Adriatic Coast and is accessible from Zagreb. These sites have re-known vernacular building, historic landscapes, and natural phenomena, which we will explore. Croatia has rich and varied features including Plitvice Lakes National Park, a World Heritage Site. This is the background through which we will explore the culture and history of Croatia.

For more information contact:
Prof. Daniel Winterbottom
Phone: 206.612.1146
Email: nina at uw dot edu
studyabroad.washington.edu

 

2013 New Orleans

2013 SUMMER DESIGN/BUILD NEW ORLEANS, LA

June 17th, 2013 – July 26th, 2013

4-6 credits LARCH 498C

Program Description
This course is open to students at all levels and from all disciplines. Led by Professor Daniel Winterbottom, we will be working with the community of Gretna, LA and Jefferson Parish to design and build a “serenity” garden in a public park. This multifunctional “serenity” garden will create a gateway into the community, provide a setting for a historic building which will function as a vistor center, and provide the community with a contemplative place to relax and learn. A reflection of historic and vernacular gardens of the period, this garden will also explore issues of sustainability and community expression. Design or construction experience is not required. All participants will partake in the design, community and building processes. This will be complemented with field trips to natural and cultural places in and around the city of New Orleans.

For more information contact:
Prof. Daniel Winterbottom
Phone: 206.612.1146
Email: nina at uw dot edu